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From Two, Many

Husband and wife improv duo conjure a multitude of characters and stories

If you truly want to be blown away by a Harold, Weirdass is the duo to see. Visiting the UCB Theatre from L.A., together Weir (of “Mad TV”) and Dassie generate as many characters, scenes and events as it normally takes six to eight players to generate. By necessity, Weir and Dassie will create multiple characters to round out the world of a single scene, and every one of these will advance character relationships and add information.

When Weirdass hits on a funny line, (in this show, ‘My Coke didn’t spill’ after a car crash), it doesn’t feel forced -- it has come from the interactions. In this show, the audience’s first sign that it was in the hands of two masters was the way Weir added the fact that her character was a mother 25 years older than Dassie’s neighborhood high school boy, and from that they were off and running.

If Weirdass could be said to be using any form or format, it would be one where the players play around the same event or moment in time and keep revisiting it as a callback. The car crash served that purpose, and with these players’ inventiveness, they recalled little details of the crash to repeat them perfectly in order while filling in other little pieces of the event not previously shown, and events leading up to and after the crash.

Of course, trust in each other as players and honing the ability to react with substance to each other’s moves is challenging to perfect. Weir and Dassie are married, and maybe that helps them reach the level they hit when performing together.

 
   

     

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